Why does NASCAR, Indy Car, Formula One, CART and every other recognized professional racing franchise prohibit air bags?

Because although there is no documented evidence that an air bag has ever saved anyone’s life, there is ample evidence that air bags have maimed and killed people.

Simple.

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7 thoughts on “Why does NASCAR, Indy Car, Formula One, CART and every other recognized professional racing franchise prohibit air bags?

  1. Apparently most people don’t. Otherwise people who are potential victims of faulty air bags would just have them disconnected and be sure to wear snugly fitted seat belts. When bureaucrats are allowed to impose mandatory safety standards dreamed up by insurance lobbyists — we get what we deserve.

    • True if you mean fire retardant clothing, helmet and a neck brace (HANS device). Other than that though, they depend on a 5 or 6 point harness (seat belt) and a rigid cage in which they operate the vehicle. In an ordinary vehicle though the best safety would come from a secure seat belt… one without a self retracting function, like a typical racing harness. That’s what I have. Once an air bag deploys, the driver can no longer keep driving. Even if their thumbs or wrists aren’t broken, the bag prevents steering.

      • You’ve provided some valuable info in the past about how to hold (or not hold) the wheel, and how far away from the wheel to sit. I do sit far enough back (long legs will do that to you) but I’m afraid I still drive with thumbs around the wheel. Long years of habit.

        • Yeah, I have that habit too. But, in the same way that I immediately look in my rear view mirror whenever I have to stop in a hurry, I try to take my thumbs from around the wheel if I get into a situation that looks like I might get bumped in the front. In a panic though, sometimes that forethought goes out the window. For the life of me I can’t understand why the first choice of the transportation guru’s isn’t to just pull the fuse from air bags suspected of being faulty.

        • I learned that quick stop – check the rearview mirror thing as a teenager. Once you’ve been rear-ended, you never forget. Good idea to move the thumbs at the same time. I’ll try to remember that.

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